David W. Fagerberg

fagerberg

Theology

David Fagerberg is a Professor of Theology. He earned Masters degrees from Luther Northwestern Seminary, St John's University (Collegeville), Yale Divinity School, and the Ph.D. from Yale University. He is a 2015 recipient of the Joyce Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching.
 
His area of study is liturgical theology: its definition and methodology. This brings him into the areas of sacramental theology, Eastern Orthodoxy, asceticism, and iconography, which has yielded fifty academic articles and book chapters, and the monographs On Liturgical Asceticism (2013) and Theologia Prima: What is Liturgical Theology? (2003). 
 
Graduate courses include Liturgical Theology, Orders & Ministry, Sacramentology, and Deification and Icons; undergraduate courses include Theology of the Mass and The Catholic Sacraments. Additionally, two undergraduate courses have proven popular. One is an elective on G.K. Chesterton (he has authored The Size of Chesterton's Catholicism, 1998, and Chesterton is Everywhere, 2013), the other is on theological themes in the fiction of C.S. Lewis, taught as a second university theology course in sections up to 150 students. He has taken undergraduates on one-week midsemester trips to Tantur, Jerusalem, and twice to Lublin, Poland. He has advised a dozen undergraduate theses.
 
The medieval scholastics called theology a science because it is a power that puts reason into a state in which it can judge objects of knowledge soundly. That is why Boethius said theology consists of joining faith to reason. And why Chesterton said about the Catholic Church that "There is no other case of one continuous intelligent institution that has been thinking about thinking for two thousand years. … To become a Catholic is not to leave off thinking, but to learn how to think. It is so in exactly the same sense in which to recover from palsy is not to leave off moving but to learn how to move." This is a good thing to do in the classroom.
 
Contact Information
Department of Theology
130 Malloy Hall
(574) 631-7811